• The CEO of the first marijuana company to IPO in the US reveals why this was the right time to go public

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Tilray, a Canadian company, became the first marijuana producer to IPO on a US-based exchange.
    The company's shares soared on its first day of trading on the Nasdaq, an indication that public markets are bullish on pot.
    Tilray CEO Brendan Kennedy told Business Insider in an interview that institutional investors wanted to see a marijuana producer list on a US exchange before putting money into the industry.
    Watch the interview below.
    Tilray, a Canadian-based company, became the first marijuana producer on Thursday to conduct an initial public offering in the US.
    The British Columbia-based...
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  • Economic View: How Consumers Can Resist Companies' Market Power

    Economic View: How Consumers Can Resist Companies' Market Power

    2 monthes ago - By NY Times

    Companies try to lock people into buying their products without comparison shopping. But consumers can fight back, an economist says.
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  • The four-day work week is good for business

    2 monthes ago - By Fast Company

    After spending two months testing a 20% shorter week, a New Zealand company found its employees happier, more focused, and producing the same amount of work. Now they're making the change permanent.
    This spring, a New Zealand company tried a new experiment: Employees could work four standard days instead of five, but would be paid their usual salary. Newly-released numbers from a study of the project, which lasted eight weeks, show that it worked. Workers' sense of work-life balance went from 54% to 78%. Stress went down. And the missed hours didn't affect job performance, which actually...
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  • The founder of a $500 million baked-goods empire says the 2 qualities that made her successful were the hardest to learn

    The founder of a $500 million baked-goods empire says the 2 qualities that made her successful were the hardest to learn

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    Kathleen King, founder of Tate's Bake Shop , recently passed her legacy into new hands when the company sold to Mondolēz International for $500 million .
    King didn't reach this level of success without a few setbacks, which taught her two important lessons about being an entrepreneur .
    To build a business, she says, you need to keep your emotions in check and persevere.
    Kathleen King knows a thing or two about building a successful business.
    She's the founder of Tate's Bake Shop , the baked-goods empire that sold for $500 million to Mondolēz International, maker of Oreo and Chips Ahoy, 18...
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  • The HR exec who helped build Netflix into a $161 billion juggernaut has some harsh advice for tech companies and their employees

    The HR exec who helped build Netflix into a $161 billion juggernaut has some harsh advice for tech companies and their employees

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    At a time when Uber is weathering a new round of HR troubles, and Google is seeing employee revolts, Patty McCord's advice seems more pertinent than ever.
    McCord is Netflix's former chief talent officer - the person who helped hire Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos, who has become one of Hollywood's most powerful figures.
    She says HR execs have to stop worrying about lavish employee perks, and start thinking more about how they can make a difference to the bottom line - just like every other department.
    Asked about handling the employee revolt at Google, McCord says "I might go...
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  • The Workologist: A Buyout Offer Sounds Tempting but Risky

    2 monthes ago - By NY Times

    Your company says layoffs are coming, but is offering a generous package to those who leave voluntarily. Should you try to keep your job, or take the money and run?
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  • A New Zealand company that tried 4-day workweeks says people were more creative, more punctual, and more energetic - and they want to keep it going

    A New Zealand company that tried 4-day workweeks says people were more creative, more punctual, and more energetic - and they want to keep it going

    2 monthes ago - By Business Insider

    A New Zealand company, Perpetual Guardian, experimented with a four-day work week, The New York Times reports.
    Seeing that employees were happier and more productive, the company wants to make it a permanent change.
    Other companies have also tried shortened work weeks and seen similar results.
    Researchers say people can only do concentrated work for a limited amount of time.
    A New Zealand company is making headlines across the globe for a recent experiment that it conducted among its staff.
    In March and April, the 240 employees at Perpetual Guardian worked four-day workweeks - and were...
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